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Kenyan Charged with 18 Counts of Murder in the US

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  • A Kenyan in the US has been charged with the murder of 18 people after new evidence linked him to an additional murder charge. 

    According to reliable US publications, Billy Chemirmir’s case had triggered the probe of the death of 750 senior citizens who died unattended during the period Chemirmir was working in North Texas, US. 

    The police are investigating to find out if any of the other deaths could be linked to Chemirmir, such as Glenna Day, who was killed on October 14, 2016, at The Tradition-Prestonwood, a luxury senior living community in Far North Dallas.

    An empty court room in Dallas, Texas.
    An empty court room in Dallas, Texas.
    File

    The suspect is a former healthcare worker who is accused of being a serial killer.

    Investigators claimed Chemirmir posed as a maintenance worker to gain access to women’s apartments, smothered them and later sold or pawned their jewelry.

    He was first arrested in 2018 and charged with the murder of a Dallas woman in her home. 

    As investigations commenced, authorities linked more deaths to him. 

    In addition to the 18 murder charges, the suspect was linked, through medical examiner reports and civil suits, to six other deaths, bringing the total of charges to 24 including theft.

    Chemirmir’s lawyer has argued that the cases against him are largely circumstantial.

    The lawyer further stated that most of the evidence may put the suspect in the area of the alleged murder, but didn’t actually pin him as the actual killer.

    “It seems like every unexplained death they come up with, they’re pinning on him. If you look at all of it, it doesn’t stand up,” Chemirmir’s advocate Philip Hayes said. 

    However, authorities maintained that they had evidence against him, including surveillance video, DNA evidence and an eyewitness account of a 91-year-old woman who survived one of his alleged attacks.

    File image of a court gavel
    File image of a court gavel
    File
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    Kenya

    Nairobi Motorists Ditch Fuel Cars for Electric Vehicles

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  • Nairobi motorists are converting their fuel cars to electronic vehicles (EV) in a trend that is slowly picking pace in the city as Kenya gears towards safe energy and curbing emissions. 

    The government seeks to have 5 percent of all registered vehicles in Kenya being electric vehicles, by 2025. As of 2019, there were only 300 electric vehicles in the country. 

    Kenyan taxi driver Charles Kaloki said that he opted for the electric car as it only took 30 minutes to charge besides saving on fuel. 

    The taxi driver’s conversion was facilitated by Finland’s electric taxi service, Nopea Ride, based in Nairobi. Nopea was launched in the county in 2018 and has charging stations at TRM along Thika Road, The Hub in Karen and Two Rivers Mall.

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    A Nopea Ride electric taxi at Two Rivers Mall
    File

    Some of the cars can be charged at home once a motorist installs a charging point. 

    “You can make better money out of this than paying for fuel in every corner in town that you visit,” he told Voice of America (VOA).

    Nopea already has 30 rented electric taxis in the city and plans to extend the cars to 100 by December 2021. Opibus, a Kenyan startup based in Industrial Area, Nairobi, also converts fuel automobiles to EVs

    The firm offers battery packs built with prismatic Lithium Iron Phosphate cells in three battery pack sizes. These are the 30 kWh, 50 kWh, and 70 kWh packs with ranges of up to 140 km, 245 km, and 350 km (87, 152, and 217 miles) respectively depending on the weight of the vehicle, terrain, and driving style. 

    Batteries can last for 100 km up to 450 km depending on the terrain and type of car. 

    When converting a vehicle, the engineers get to remove the engine, fuel tanks and gearbox, and replace them with their drive trains, which comprises an electric motor, battery packs, power electronics and auxiliary systems such as driver touch screen interface, and type 2 charging port.

    After disassembling the fuel car, the new electric motor is mounted as well as batteries and power electronics. Functionalities such as power steering, 4WD and driving in shallow water are retained within the same total weight.

    EVs came in three types. Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) combine the benefits of gasoline engines and electric motors. Plug-in hybrids use a petrol or diesel engine alongside the electric motor and 100% EVs use batteries which need to be charged. 

    These EV’s are superior to the combustion engine when it comes to torque and power. One can achieve peak torque from stationary with a continuous powerful acceleration.

    They also have clean power (no emissions), increased performance, lower running costs and silent operation (no rumbling noise). To power the vehicles, mechanics offer a complete solution stretching from energy production to energy storage and charging.

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    Opibus CEO Filip Gardle recharges an electric car at their workshop in Embakasi, Nairobi
    The Standard
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    Kenya

    Journalists Cautioned Against Hustler & Dynasty Slogans

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  • Journalists have been urged to refrain from publishing inflammatory and divisive slogans that have the potential of causing divisions in the country.

    In a sensitisation meeting with scribes on January 27, 2021, the National Cohesion and Integration Commission (NCIC) appealed to the media to desist from being used by politicians as a channel to advance divisive politics.

    NCIC Commissioner Phillip Okundi stated that the hustler and dynasty slogans as peddled by politicians in the country are a threat to the peace and calm enjoyed by the people.

    “You people should not be used by anybody to try and write things that will cause violence amongst our people,” Okundi urged.

    NCIC Commissioner Phillip Okundi and Dorcas Kedogo addressing the media on October 28, 2020.
    NCIC Commissioner Phillip Okundi and Dorcas Kedogo addressing the media on October 28, 2020.
    KNA

    He further stated that the narrative of dynasties and hustlers, ‘the haves and have nots’ had been used to divide people in political scenes worldwide for a long time.

    “We should not use such terms, taking them to heart and trying to arouse unnecessary feelings which would make us work against Kenyans who deserve to live peaceful lives,” Okundi remarked.

    The NCIC commissioner cautioned politicians in the country against using the hustlers and dynasties slogans in campaigns, as they are likely to create a toxic rift between members of the public.

    Onkundi reiterated that scribes should not be used to champion certain political beliefs and ideologies especially at a time when the country inches closer to the 2022 general elections.

    NCIC Commissioner Dorcas Kedogo urged members of the public to shun divisive politics and embrace each other regardless of the disparities in social class.

    The call by NCIC comes at the back of the political tension brewing in the country pitting supporters of Deputy President William Ruto against proponents of the handshake between President Uhuru Kenyatta and ODM Leader Raila Odinga.

    The NCIC has in the past expressed its belief in the power of the media in creating and advancing social change.

    In a press in Nandi County on October 28, 2020, Okundi had urged journalists be at the forefront in enlightening members of the public on matters cohesion and the understanding of national values as enshrined in the Kenyan constitution

    “I’d like the media to be champions of peace by being objective in their reporting and not igniting the masses negatively through malicious and sensational print or broadcast material,” Okundi had stated.

    “I call upon the media to be principled and observe code of ethics as they report on issues that are conflictual and should not take sides to attract sales,” Kedogo had on her part urged.

    Microphones set up for a press conference in Nairobi on Thursday, February 20, 2020.
    Microphones set up for a press conference in Nairobi on Thursday, February 20, 2020.
    Muhabarishaji.com
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    Kenya

    Milimani Law Courts Closed

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  • The Registrar of the High Court of Kenya has announced the closure of the Milimani Law Courts for the period begining January 29 to January 31, 2021.

    In a statement, the Registrar stated that the closure will pave way for a fumigation exercise at the courts as a measure to curb the spread of Covid-19 through the corridors of justice.

    The fumigation exercise will be conducted on January 29 and January 30, with the last day of the month, expected to allow for aeration of the chambers.

    An empty court room.
    An empty court room.
    File

    The Registrar further announced that normal services at the court will resume on February 1, 2021

    “We regret the inconvenience caused to all court users,” the statement reads in part.

    Since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic in the country, the courts have devised measures to prevent further spread of the virus while deliberating on cases as well.

    Several courthouses in the country resorted to virtual hearings while others sought to hold cases in open spaces.

    The move to close the courts for fumigation come at the back of the persistent positive Covid-19 cases in the country.

    On January 26, the Ministry of Health had announced that 141 more people had tested positive for Covid-19 from a sample size of 3,571 tested in 24 hours leading up to January 26.

    The cumulative confirmed positive Covid-19 cases in the country now stands at 100,193. 

    Cumulative recoveries in the country is at 83,625 after 207 more patients were discharged after recovering from the virus.

    A judge hears a case outside Milimani Law Courts.
    A judge hears a case outside Milimani Law Courts.
    Twitter
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